Plato and myth studies on the use and status of Platonic myths by Catherine Collobert

Cover of: Plato and myth | Catherine Collobert

Published by Brill in Leiden, Boston .

Written in English

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Subjects:

  • Congresses,
  • Myth

Edition Notes

Book details

Statementedited by Catherine Collobert, Pierre Destrée, Francisco J. Gonzalez
SeriesMnemosyne. Supplements -- v. 337
Classifications
LC ClassificationsB395 .P517 2012
The Physical Object
Paginationp. cm.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL25087131M
ISBN 109789004218666
LC Control Number2011042778

Download Plato and myth

The second part of the book contrasts this sense of myth, as Plato does, with another form of speech which he believed was far superior: the "logos" of philosophy.

Brisson's work is part lexical, part philosophical, and part ethnological, This volume seeks to show how the philosophy of Plato relates to the literary form of his discourse. Myth is one aspect of this relation whose importance for the study of Plato is only now beginning to be recognized.

Reflection on this topic is essential not only for understanding Plato s conception of philosophy and its methods, but also for understanding more broadly the relation between ?id=p2lY4w3HMbMC.

In addition, there are a few more general articles. The first deals with the saying "Amicus Plato sed magis amica veritas" and studies the different forms of this proverb from the time of Plato and Aristotle to Cervantes in the 17th century.

Another one discusses the rather complex transmission of Plato's alleged ://?lang=en. For us, on the contrary, the term 'myth' denotes a false belief. Between the archaic notion of myth and ours stands Plato's.

This volume is a collection of ten studies by eminent scholars that focus on the ways in which some of Plato's most famous myths are interwoven with his :// Elements of Plato’s Anthropology in the Myth of Prometheus (Protagoras, D–D) Whip Scars on the Naked Soul: Myth and Elenchos in Plato’s Gorgias The Status of the Myth of the Gorgias, or: Taking Plato ?language=en.

We have a comprehensive book about the people of Plato: Nails (); now we also have one about the animals of Plato: Bell and Naas (). Anyone interested in myth, metaphor, and on how people and animals are intertwined in Plato would be rewarded by consulting :// This book rethinks Plato’s creation and use of myth by drawing on theories and methods from myth studies, religious studies, literary theory and related fields.

Individual myths function differently depending on cultural practice, religious context or literary tradition, and this interdisciplinary study merges new perspectives in Plato   The word myth is commonly thought to mean a fictional story, but few know that Plato was the first to use the term muthos in that sense.

He also used muthos to describe the practice of making and telling stories, the oral transmission of all that a community keeps in its collective memory. In the first part of Plato the Myth Maker, Luc Brisson reconstructs Plato's multifaceted description of  › Books › New, Used & Rental Textbooks › Humanities.

"Religion and Morality. Elements of Plato’s Anthropology in the Myth of Prometheus (Protagoras, D–D)" published on 01 Jan by ://?language=en. The Myth of Er from Plato's Republic tells the story of a soldier, Er, who is thought to be dead and descends to the underworld. But when he revives he   Plato's dialogues frequently criticize traditional Greek myth, yet Plato also integrates myth with his writing.

Daniel S. Werner confronts this paradox through an in-depth analysis of the Phaedrus, Plato's most mythical :// 2 days ago  Plato: The Republic – Book 3 Summary and Analysis (click link for full play list). Plato’s Social Structure (Different Books) First when discussing the idea city state in Book II, Plato first describes how all citizens fill necessary roles.

He then goes onto say, that the necessary will bore people, and thus people will seek   7 Plato: myth and the soul The Gorgias The Phaedo The Republic The Phaedrus 8 Plato: myth and theory unable to gauge, for the myth with which this book is concerned is post-philosophical.

It is myth seen through a philosophical lens and incorporated into philosophical discourse. As a form of truth it is Petridis' book, Plato's Mythologizing the Myth of Er, exposes the themes and ideas brought to life in the Myth of Er.

The Republic is of political, social and religious importance and has influenced every way of thinking and discipline since its conception. One cannot fully understand the impact of Plato, Socrates and Aristotle without :// The Myth of Er is a myth about the afterlife, and it describes in great detail the journeys that await souls there.

It is also one of the great longstanding puzzles in the interpretation of the Republic: there is no scholarly consensus as to why Plato chose to the end his most important work of   Plato and myth; studies on the use and status of Platonic myths. by Catherine Collobert et al.

BRILL pages $ Hardcover Mnemosyne. Supplements; v B This collection of twenty essays explores the relevance of myth and literary form in Plato's philosophy and by extension philosophy in ://+and+myth;+studies+on+the+use+and+status+of.

Plato, myth is myth of the philosopher (Edelstein,p ). Denied the above theses, Edelstein will classify myths into two groups: I) Those who report the creation of the world and the 's_philosophy. This book rethinks Plato’s creation and use of myth by drawing on theories and methods from myth studies, religious studies, literary theory and related fields.

Individual myths function differently depending on cultural practice, religious context or literary tradition, and this interdisciplinary study merges new perspectives in Plato   C.S. Lewis was a man who understood Plato, even better than an expert like A.E.

Taylor, a scholar on Plato. Taylor aspired to be the apologist that Lewis :// This book explores the dynamic relationship between myth and philosophy in the Presocratics, the Sophists, and in Plato - a relationship which is found to be more extensive and programmatic than has been recognized.

The story of philosophy's relationship with myth is that of its relationship with literary and social ://   We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book. 豆瓣成员常用的标签(共2个) Plato Myth Homer, Plato, and the Afterlife.

The fate of Persephone is but one of many glimpses into the underworld found in Greek myths. There are many accounts of the afterlife in various myths, but the fullest descriptions of the underworld are found in Book 11 of Homer’s Odyssey (circa B.C.E.) and the “Myth of Er” in Plato’s Republic (circa B.C.E.).?module_item.

This volume seeks to show how the philosophy of Plato relates to the literary form of his discourse. Myth is one aspect of this relation whose importance for the study of Plato is only now beginning to be recognized.

Reflection on this topic is essential not only for understanding About the Book. The word myth is commonly thought to mean a fictional story, but few know that Plato was the first to use the term muthos in that sense.

He also used muthos to describe the practice of making and telling stories, the oral transmission of all that a community keeps in its collective :// It hardly needs repeating that Plato defined philosophy partly by contrast with the work of the poets. What is extraordinary is how little systematic exploration there has been of his relationship with specific poets other than Homer.

This neglect extends even to Hesiod, though Hesiod is of central importance for the didactic tradition quite generally, and is a major source of imagery at ?id=34_MI1Lm4DIC.

The word myth is commonly thought to mean a fictional story, but few know that Plato was the first to use the term muthos in that sense. He also used muthos to describe the practice of making and telling stories, the oral transmission of all that a community keeps in its collective memory.

In the first part of Plato the Myth Maker, Luc Brisson reconstructs Plato's multifaceted description of ?id=xtKwwrdUKuoC. This position is developed and argued for extensively in Luc Brisson, Plato the Myth Maker (Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, ); originally published as Platon: les mots et les mythes (Paris: Éditions La Découverte, ).

Hereafter this book is identified as PMM. Why did Plato conclude the Republic, arguably his most celebrated work of political theory, with the Myth of Er, an obscure story of indeterminate political-theoretical significance?This paper advances a novel reading of the Myth of Er that attends to the common plot that it shares with two earlier narrative interludes in the suggests that Plato constructed the myth as an account Plato's penchant for mythmaking sits uneasily beside his reputation as the inventor of rationalist philosophy.

Hegel's solution was to ignore the myths. Popper thought them disqualifying. Tae-Yeoun Keum responds by carving out a place for myth in the context of rationalism and shows how Plato's tales inspired history's great political ://?isbn= This book rethinks Plato’s creation and use of myth by drawing on theories and methods from myth studies, religious studies, literary theory and related fields.

Individual myths function differently depending on cultural practice, religious context or literary tradition, and this interdisciplinary study merges new perspectives in Plato  › Books › Literature & Fiction › History & Criticism.

Plato's dialogues frequently criticize traditional Greek myth, yet Plato also integrates myth with his writing. Daniel S. Werner confronts this paradox through an in-depth analysis of Phaedrus, Plato's most mythical dialogue, arguing that it leads readers to participate in Plato's dialogues and to engage in a process of  › Books › New, Used & Rental Textbooks › Humanities.

In the first part of Plato the Myth Maker, Luc Brisson reconstructs Plato's multifaceted description of muthos in light of the latter's Atlantis story. The second part of the book contrasts this sense of myth with another form of speech that Plato believed was far superior: the logos of :// Plato's Allegory of the Cave is one of the most elegant and important metaphors in Western philosophy.

It is a dialogue between Plato's brother Glaucon and his mentor Socrates, narrated by the latter, in which Plato elucidates his Theory of ://?id=50T6DQAAQBAJ. The second part of the book contrasts this sense of myth, as Plato does, with another form of speech that he believed was far superior: the logos of philosophy.\"--BOOK JACKET.

\"Appearing for the first time in English, Plato the Myth Maker is a solid and important contribution to the history of myth, The editor with P.

Destrée and F. Gonzalez of Plato and Myth: Studies on the Use and Status of Platonic Myths, she has published extensively on myth and poetry in Plato, as well as on Homer, including her monograph, Parier sur le temps: la quête héroïque d’immortalité dans l’épopée homérique (Les   The word myth is commonly thought to mean a fictional story, but few know that Plato was the first to use the term muthos in that sense.

He also used muthos to describe the practice of making and telling stories, the oral transmission of all that a community keeps in its collective memory.

In the first part of Plato the Myth Maker, Luc Brisson reconstructs Plato’s multifaceted description of Shelves: platonism, philosophy, myth, greco-roman-myth This book certainly had some great information, but really lacked focus.

The writer was either over zealous, or attempting to make a show of his erudition; my feeling is it was probably more the former than the :// The seductions of Hesiod: Pandora's presence in Plato's Symposium / Vered Lev Kenaan ; 'Hesiod's race and your own': Socrates' 'Hesiodic' project / Helen Van Noorden ; Plato's Hesiod and the will of Zeus: philosophical rhapsody in the Timaeus and the Critias / Andrea Capra ; Chaos corrected: Hesiod in Plato's creation myth/ E.E.

Pender This book rethinks Plato's creation and use of myth by drawing on theories and methods from myth studies, religious studies, literary theory and related fields. Individual myths function differently depending on cultural practice, religious context or literary tradition, and this interdisciplinary study merges new perspectives in Plato studies There is a strong contrast between the argumentative passages in many Platonic dialogues and the elaborate myths and allegories that are often offered either alongside the arguments or to supplant them.

This chapter argues that the relation between argument and myth is a dialectical one. On the whole, argumentative approaches to questions of ontology and explanation subscribe to ontological :oso//. Brisson, also enamoured with the idea of Plato-at-the-cusp, makes much of the opposition in his book, basing his findings about Platonic myth on the change that occurred from an oral to a literate

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