Novel phytoplankton blooms causes and impacts of recurrent brown tides and other unusual blooms

Cover of: Novel phytoplankton blooms |

Published by Springer-Verlag in Berlin, New York .

Written in English

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Subjects:

  • Algal blooms -- Congresses.,
  • Brown tide -- Congresses.

Edition Notes

Book details

StatementE.M. Cosper, V.M. Bricelj, E.J. Carpenter, eds.
SeriesCoastal and estuarine studies ;, 35
ContributionsCosper, E. M. 1942-, Bricelj, V. M. 1950-, Carpenter, Edward J.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQK568.B55 N68 1989
The Physical Object
Paginationxii, 799 p. :
Number of Pages799
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2204302M
ISBN 103540519610, 0387519610
LC Control Number89026150

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A symposium entitled, "Novel Phytoplankton Blooms: Causes and Impacts of Recurrent Brown Tides and Other Unusual Blooms", was convened on October 27 and 28 at the State University of New York at Stony Brook on Long Island, with registrants and nearly 50 scientific papers presented by researchers from the united States as well as : Paperback.

About this book A massive phytoplankton bloom, locally termed "brown tide", suddenly appeared in Long Island marine bays incolored the water a dark brown, decimated eelgrass beds and caused catastrophic starvation and recruitment failure of commercially important bay scallop populations.

A massive phytoplankton bloom, locally termed "brown tide", suddenly appeared in Long Island marine bays incolored the water a dark brown, decimated eelgrass beds and caused catastrophic starvation and recruitment failure of commercially important bay scallop populations.

A symposium entitled, "Novel Phytoplankton Blooms: Causes and Impacts of Recurrent Brown Tides and Other Unusual Blooms", was convened on October 27 and 28 at the State University of New York at Stony Brook on Long Island, with registrants and nearly 50 scientific papers presented by researchers from the united States as well as Europe.

Toxic Phytoplankton Blooms in the Sea: Proceedings of the Fifth Intgernational Conference on Toxic Marine Phytoplankton, Newport, Rhode Island, U.S. (DEVELOPMENTS IN MARINE BIOLOGY) 1st Edition by Theodore J.

Smayda (Author), Yuzuru Shimizu (Editor)Author: Theodore J. Smayda. Purchase Phytoplankton - 2nd Edition. Print Book & E-Book. ISBNBook Edition: 2. Cambridge Core - Oceanography and Marine Science - Phytoplankton Pigments - edited by Suzanne Roy. novel phytoplankton blooms of indigenous species, both benign and harmful ones, has accompanied nutrient enrichment of coastal waters ind inland seas on a global Size: 1MB.

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Novel phytoplankton blooms: causes and impacts of recurrent brown tides and other unusual blooms. This book discusses the findings of most of the active researchers in taxonomy, molecular biology, ecology, physiology and toxicology, and public health officials concerned with the apparent global.

Abstract: A simple model that describes the dynamics of nutrient‐driven phytoplankton blooms is presented. Apart from complicated simulation studies, very few models reported in the literature have taken this “bottom‐up” approach.

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Recent receding of the ice pack allows more sunlight to penetrate into the Arctic Ocean, enhancing productivity of a single annual phytoplankton bloom. Increasing river runoff may, however, enhance the yet pronounced upper ocean stratification and prevent any significant wind‐driven vertical mixing and upward supply of nutrients Cited by: In this marvellous new book Colin Reynolds deals with the adaptations, physiology and popula- tion dynamics of the phytoplankton communities of lakes and rivers, of seas and the great Size: 8MB.

The “brown tide” algal blooms brought about significant changes in the benthic community as well. The high cell densities (>10 9 l -1) of A.

anophagefferens significantly increased light absorption in the water column (Cosper et al., ), and reduced the light available to Cited by: Phytoplankton Pigments is a follow-up to the volume Phytoplankton Pigments in Oceanography.

Since then, there have been many advances concerning phytoplankton pigments. Phytoplankton Pigments includes recent discoveries on several new algal classes particularly for the picoplankton, and on new pigments. It also includes many advances in. These plankton “blooms” are common throughout the world’s oceans and can be composed of phytoplankton, zooplankton, or gelatinous zooplankton, depending on the environmental conditions.

Generally phytoplankton (plankton that use photosynthesis like plants) need nutrients and light to grow at very high rates. 11 - Dynamics of phytoplankton blooms and nutrient limitation in the Pearl River (Zhujiang) estuarine coastal waters from Section III - Eastern hemisphere systems By K.

Yin, J. Xu, Z. Lai, P. HarrisonCited by: 2. Phaeocystis globosa is a phytoplankton species with unicellular and colonial stages that can form dense blooms in temperate coastal waters of the North Sea (up to 10 8 liter −1 [7, 10, 11]) The ability to generate high biomass, dominate the phytoplankton community for extended periods, and produce dimethylsulfoniopropionate and dimethyl sulfide makes this alga a model species for Cited by:   Communities of microscopic plant life, or phytoplankton, dominate the Earth's aquatic ecosystems.

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Reynolds. Nearly all phytoplankton blooms along the California coast and within the Gulf of the Farallones involve nontoxigenic species. Conversely, most incidents of paralytic shellfish poi-soning (PSP) in humans caused by eating shellfish caught in California waters have occurred in the absence of visible blooms of toxin-producing Size: 2MB.

Algal blooms associated with flood plumes due to inputs of river-derived nutrients reduce water clarity. These phytoplankton blooms as well as non-algal suspended particulate matter (detritus, clay particles) in the plume reduce light availability for benthic plant communities including seagrass and coral (Collier et al., a; Petus et al.

Phytoplankton growth is often limited by the scarcity of iron in the ocean. As a result, many people are discussing plans to fertilize large areas of the ocean with iron to promote phytoplankton blooms that would transfer more carbon from the atmosphere to the deep sea.

Phytoplankton are critical to other ocean biogeochemical cycles, as well. A Novel Protein, Ubiquitous in Marine Phytoplankton, Concentrates Iron at the Cell Surface and Facilitates Uptake Author links open overlay panel Joe Morrissey 1 7 Robert Sutak 2 Javier Paz-Yepes 1 Atsuko Tanaka 1 8 Ahmed Moustafa 3 Alaguraj Veluchamy 1 Yann Thomas 1 Hugo Botebol 4 François-Yves Bouget 4 Jeffrey B.

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González, Gabriel Roldán. Phytoplankton blooms are most frequent in waters with a thriving marine population and where abundant nutrients needed for phytoplankton growth are added in a continuous stream, or in surges. These are often areas along the edges of continents where nutrients are supplied through river runoff, or where cold nutrient-rich waters from ocean.

Despite naturally high nutrient concentrations and productivity6,7,8, nitrogen-rich agricultural runoff fuels large (54– km2) phytoplankton blooms in the Gulf of by:   The vast blooms of microscopic phytoplankton feed krill, which are larger, shrimp-like plankton.

In turn, fish, penguins, and whales live on the krill. “Changing the arrival and departure of sea ice changes the timing of phytoplankton growth,” said Montes-Hugo.

“The krill are disappearing in the north and are actually increasing in the south. The spring bloom is a strong increase in phytoplankton abundance (i.e.

stock) that typically occurs in the early spring and lasts until late spring or early summer. This seasonal event is characteristic of temperate North Atlantic, sub-polar, and coastal waters.

Phytoplankton blooms occur when growth exceeds losses, however there is no universally accepted definition of the magnitude of change. Phytoplankton Have Turned The Bosphorus A Stunning Turquoise: The Two-Way When conditions are right, phytoplankton populations can grow explosively.

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